Outdoor 30

First outdoor tournament of the year for the older one.  She is a “bowmen” class and that means she really can’t compete in the big national tournaments that have Cadet and Junior programs only.  Technically, she can shoot in those older age divisions, but the shooting distance starts at 60 and you have to pull a pretty big bow to shoot that distance.  Locally, one (or maybe two) of the JOAD clubs has set up an outdoor series.  This includes shorter distances for the younger divisions, including 30 for bowmen.

Like all archery events we have attended outdoors, you have to deal with the sun and the wind.  This was no different.  Our car thermometer said it was 101.  She had ramped down lessons over the last month, so this was her first event in at least a month.  She shot outside at the park and she got reps in on the side yard.  She used her new Easton outdoor arrows.  She ended up in third place.

Bowmen Year End

So many things for this archery season.  She added a sight.  She added a stabilizer.  She got a new, heavier poundage bow.  She got a new plunger.  She went out of state.  She shot 40cm.  She made an archery-BFF.  She got outdoor arrows.  She got a new practice bow.  She is rebuilding her shot sequence.  She survived some friends leaving her team.  She got a new mentor.  She trained with and survived her sister.  She started shooting with her mom.  She fought with and then made up with her dad.

She has worked on her form since SLC, but early in the tournament, her fast shot returned.  She fought it some and went with it on other ends.  She improved over SLC, but didn’t reach some of the scores from early in the season.

Overall, the season isn’t easy to chart.  With her equipment changes and target size changes, it’s not easy to compare scores from 40cm to 60cm.

It was a year of some podium finishes, some off days, a lot of practice, a lot of work, a lot of stress, and a lot of growth.  She has more of the same in front of her for several years in and out of archery.  Keep at it kiddo.

Her third place finish!

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Second (or First?) Rotational

After her own switch to the left, the younger one took part in her second tournament, but it could almost be considered her first since she is doing everything new.

They packed the young kids into one side of the range.  It was interesting to see them try to stay in their shooter’s box.  I suspect many of them shoot with a lot of space on the line at practice.  With her riser, new limbs, and stabilizer, she had a bigger presence compared to the compound shooters their little bows.

She doubled her score from the first tournament and took home first place and a new Hoyt cap.

Meet The Risers

risers

What is the difference between a riser of one family and a riser of another family?  I don’t know if it is tremendously different as a purchaser of equipment.  Here’s the Prodigy XT and the Horizon Grand Prix.  If we don’t look at their profile with different lace structure patterns, I see a lot of similarities in the arrow platform, the stem, and the thickness of the bow.   I understand that the Prodigy has a variation of ILF that I haven’t quite understood.  I miss the old apple logo from Hoyt (which may be part of Easton’s old offerings, more here).

Too Much Gear

The younger one is doing pretty well shooting with her (left) hand me down kit (Hoyt Grand Prix Horizon Pro 25″ – still available even with model year turn over) and with a splash of black accessories, the bow doesn’t look like it used to when the older one used it for a palette of ocean colors.

But wait, who is that in the background?  Have we found a home for her right handed bow?

Swap Meet

The Prodigy XT 25 arrived and a whole bunch of other stuff.  Time to get this hand me down process started.  First, time to build up the older kid’s bow with the help of her coach.  We adjusted tillers and checked for staightness.

Her coach had some used limbs we could buy and that means her draw weight poundage is going up.  These limbs are made of wood.  That seems appropriate for her for now.  Future choices include all carbon, foam, and even bamboo.  Sometimes it feels less like innovation and more like product specialization.  Although, the only perspective I have is that of the customer.

Her Shibuya stabilizer, the Shibuya plunger, and Shibuya sight joined some vanity Hoyt tillers and her blue string to make one sharp looking white kit.

Then, on to the refitting of her old bow (Hoyt Grand Prix Horizon).  Black and teal seem to be an acceptable scheme for the younger one.  A teal left handed quiver goes with her new-to-her riser.  More work to do…

Switching It Up

After a little coaching and encouragement, the younger one tried the left handed practice bow and her groupings changed.  Yes, another left eye dominant daughter, as feared.  What to do? It means another riser, quiver, finger tab, and possibly new fletchings.  Then, there is the buy nice or buy twice dilemma, but almost in reverse.  Did I want another JOAD starting bow?

I decided to go another route.  I would upgrade the older kid’s riser and do a hand me down program.  The younger kid would get the electric teal Hoyt. It was after the ATA trade show and that means the official roll over of models of bows.  Just like cars, bows have a model year and retailers may want to get rid of them for a discount.  I found the Hoyt Prodigy XT 25 and it was 26% off.  Now to think about limbs…