Outdoor 30

First outdoor tournament of the year for the older one.  She is a “bowmen” class and that means she really can’t compete in the big national tournaments that have Cadet and Junior programs only.  Technically, she can shoot in those older age divisions, but the shooting distance starts at 60 and you have to pull a pretty big bow to shoot that distance.  Locally, one (or maybe two) of the JOAD clubs has set up an outdoor series.  This includes shorter distances for the younger divisions, including 30 for bowmen.

Like all archery events we have attended outdoors, you have to deal with the sun and the wind.  This was no different.  Our car thermometer said it was 101.  She had ramped down lessons over the last month, so this was her first event in at least a month.  She shot outside at the park and she got reps in on the side yard.  She used her new Easton outdoor arrows.  She ended up in third place.

Bowmen Year End

So many things for this archery season.  She added a sight.  She added a stabilizer.  She got a new, heavier poundage bow.  She got a new plunger.  She went out of state.  She shot 40cm.  She made an archery-BFF.  She got outdoor arrows.  She got a new practice bow.  She is rebuilding her shot sequence.  She survived some friends leaving her team.  She got a new mentor.  She trained with and survived her sister.  She started shooting with her mom.  She fought with and then made up with her dad.

She has worked on her form since SLC, but early in the tournament, her fast shot returned.  She fought it some and went with it on other ends.  She improved over SLC, but didn’t reach some of the scores from early in the season.

Overall, the season isn’t easy to chart.  With her equipment changes and target size changes, it’s not easy to compare scores from 40cm to 60cm.

It was a year of some podium finishes, some off days, a lot of practice, a lot of work, a lot of stress, and a lot of growth.  She has more of the same in front of her for several years in and out of archery.  Keep at it kiddo.

Her third place finish!

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Yeoman Year End

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The last indoor tournament of the season was at our home range.  Little one is shooting all the way to the right.  She’s been shooting better and better during practice.  If she could convince her growing mind to stay focused, it would probably be a good tournament.

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Her form is getting better.  She’s not arching her back to get to full draw (as much) and she’s doing better with vertical hold on her bow.  Her feet find a slightly different stance nearly every end of shooting, but she’s getting the hang of it.  In the end, she did really well, scoring her best 600 arrow score.  It was good enough for second place, including 16 yellows (nine or ten score).

This is her first season.  She’s enjoyed getting a new bow, then switching to her dominant left eye and getting another new bow (at least to her).  Over three tournaments, she’s been doing a great job of making improvements.

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Her scores for a 30 end round since December

Her points per arrow have been rising too.

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Her main competitor is shooting just about eight points per arrow, but she is at the upper end of the age bracket.

Outdoor Arrows for Shooting 30+

Her coach suggested some outdoor arrows. That means breaking free from our standard aluminum arrow.  Indoor arrows can have a wider tube (“shaft”) and for recurve use feather fletchings vs plastic vanes.  This could mean soliciting lots of opinions and getting advice from different range staffers or messaging with Lancaster Archery.  Instead I took a recommendation from the excellent Easton Archery Podcast and decided to focus on the Carbon One. Her coach agreed, but now more questions. Arrows aren’t like picking a soccer ball, you could select the Adidas Tango and then the next choice is color and size.  With arrows, the dimensions of choice include size, shaft weight, spine @28″ span, length, fletchings, and point weight.  She is not ready for a clicker (which assists in the shot sequence and will alter the arrow length), so we don’t know how long the arrows should be nor the shaft weight.  These will be the first two questions a tech will ask you.  Her coach let her try some different sizes Of Carbon Ones, but they were mostly cut to work with clickers. When she shot these short arrows, her coach said they were “porpoising”, which means wavering up and down. That means longer arrows are required.

It is hard to avoid the complexity of the Easton Arrow Selection Chart.  Despite a lot of work to make the chart user friendly, you have to know a lot about you, your bow, and your setup.  This is a moving target for a young archer.

The Easton Selection Chart

Her coach suggested getting a couple of weights and testing them out.  We have three each of 1000 and 1150 with the recommended tip.  The Easton tip is 70, 80, or 90 points, which is a unit of measure for weight.  The tip breaks off at various places to change the weight.

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They are attached with hot melt which is a glue that is applied with heat versus a cement glue.  The plastic vanes are attached with a slight offset.


The only thing in common with the aluminum arrow is the Easton G Nock (no pin).

These thinner arrows shoot faster (they stick into the bale further) and shoot farther (her misses were further down the range).  This sounds complicated, and we are at the novice stage.  I suspect this is why there is a lot of “follow the leader” in arrow selection or “buying from the top of the list” – if you notice that Brady Ellison uses the Easton X10 (their high price arrow), and you purchase it, you don’t leave room for too many excuses with your equipment.

 

From the Archives

 These are from her first day shooting at the original No Limits.  She is wearing her Wonder Woman “Girl Power” shirt.


Probably trip two to No Limits.


Trying out practice at Bear Creek.  Confusing times with those early days of JOAD.


A Saturday in April 2014 at Bear Creek